Your Denver Counseling: Recent Health News for Denver and ColoradoYour Denver Counseling: Recent Health Tips for You*

The Case for Taking Teen Depression Seriously

Many parents see emotional turmoil as just part of adolescence. But it may be a sign of something more serious that therapy can change.  Read Article >

Is the Time Change Getting You Down?

The end of daylight savings may bring depression along with it. Depression seems to increase right after residents of the Northern hemisphere set their clocks back in the fall.    Read Article >

Alcohol’s Diminishing Returns

Drinking is a pleasure and a hazard. It offers health benefits, particularly for the heart, that rapidly give way to health risks if a person drinks more than moderately. A recent study set the bar for alcohol consumption at a drink a day. And while the precise amount may vary depending on the type of alcoholic beverage consumed, the basic message is clear: daily heavy drinking does your body no favors.

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How Stress Messes with the Brain
Stress, especially ongoing, chronic stress, can wreak havoc on the mind. It can leave you feeling lost, disconnected, forgetful, distracted and unable to act. That is why when we are stressed, we can find ourselves in the grocery store or the car, unable to immediately remember what we are doing there. The reason for this is that stress affects brain cells’ connectivity and processing speed, literally slowing our ability to think.

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Does Multitasking Corrode the Brain?
The more people use multiple devices to multitask, the greater the loss of density in a key area of their brains.

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The Power of Curiosity
Curiosity literally makes the brain more open to learning. Can we use this information in schools?

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Stress Can Add Calories

Stress’s effect on metabolism is well-documented. It can impact insulin levels, and now a study finds that it can add an extra 100 calories a day or 11 pounds a year. If you are depressed, it’s even worse news — triglycerides rise, too. We all crave comfort food when we are stressed, but if you pick the right foods you can keep some of stress’s effects in check — even if you can’t always avoid the stress itself. Read Article >
A Lack of Memory, or Motivation?
Seniors may not be losing mental skills as they age — they may be losing motivation. Read More 

Is Stress Eroding Your Memory?

High levels of stress hormones reduce interconnections among cells in the brain, interfering with our ability to remember.

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Suicide and Cigarettes

Cigarettes lift mood, but they also leave a person vulnerable to depression. It’s not just your heart and lungs that are at risk.

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How Not to Cheer up a Friend

People with low self-esteem don’t always want to be cheered up. Choose your words wisely.

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Depression and Perimenopause

Fluctuating estrogen levels during perimenopause destabilizes brain chemicals linked to mood. No wonder some women become depressed.

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Depression or Distress?

“Depressed” people with diabetes may not be clinically depressed – they may just be reacting to having an illness. Read More >

The Gap in Alcohol Treatment

One in ten adults in the United States has an alcohol use disorder (AUD). A person’s problem with alcohol may be simple physical dependence or involve binges that endanger themselves and others. Treatments for AUD are not as comprehensive as those for heart patients or diabetics. Worse, delivery is fractured, leaving too many without access to the drugs or therapy that could help.Read Article >

In Sickness and Divorce

When a spouse becomes ill, the marriage can suffer. This is especially true for women.

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From Bad to Worse

When we are stressed, the comfort foods we crave have an even worse impact on our weight and health than usual.

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Bullying’s Scars Seen in Adulthood

We tend to think of bullying as schoolyard behavior, but it can affect victims even as adults.

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Mind Over Sneezing

Stress makes allergies worse, a study has found, and it may mean that calming the mind can help prevent them.

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Over-Worn Genes

A stressful early life can make kids’ genes look like those of someone much older. All the more reason to help them find ways to de-stress. Read More >

Help for Brains Prone to Anxiety

The brain chemistry of people with anxiety may make it more difficult for them to turn off activity. Luckily, there appears to be a way to change this.

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How Old is Your Heart?

Time to figure out if your lifestyle at 40 has left you with the heart of a 20-year-old or a 60-year-old.

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Parent Power

Parents, you have more influence than you think when it comes to helping kids curb screen time. Use it.

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Not Ecstasy in Disguise

Mephedrone, a new club drug, has effects similar to those of MDMA, but it appears to be more addictive.

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Chocolate: In Your Gut, You Know It’s Right

Bacteria in the gut like chocolate almost as much as we do. That’s why it’s so good for you.

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Americans’ Diets Take a Turn for the Better

A survey of Americans’ eating habits finds they’re eating at home more. Waistlines and even wallets may benefit.

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Partners in Conflict

When it comes to resolving conflicts in romantic relationships, one thing matters more than communication.

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Memory Or Embroidery?

Our memory for childhood events is usually basic and modest. The details we recall are often added later.

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Stress Messes with Your Gray Matter

Chronic stress appears to alter the balance of white to gray brain matter. This may explain several mental disorders.

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Anxiety’s New Address

An area of the brain believed to calm us down appears to have quite the opposite effect when anxiety strikes.

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ADHD: Good News or Bad?

The Centers for Disease Control has found that the number of children diagnosed with attention deficit problems has increased dramatically. So has the use of medication to treat the impulsiveness and other issues that socially isolate children and adults with ADHD. For every child helped by receiving an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder diagnosis, is another simply being given drugs rather than the behavioral help they need? To learn more about my work with Adult ADHD clients click here.

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Spirituality on the Brain

The brains of people who are religious differ from those who aren’t. Does the brain or religion make the difference?

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Mindfulness meditation can also help train the brain. Read More>

Yoga’s Lasting Benefits for Cancer Survivors

Yoga improved cancer survivors’ energy, reduced fatigue, and eased inflammation at the cellular level.

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Boost Your Self Control

Our willpower can fail us when we are tired or stressed. But how we view the problem could be the problem.

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Train Your Brain

Just as physical exercise produces lasting benefits for the body, brain training  makes you sharper. A Johns Hopkins study found the improvements seen with even short-term training may last as long as ten years.

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Sex Tips For Doctors

Too few doctors want to talk about sex with their teen aged patients. Kids aren’t too keen on the idea either. When you consider that doctors are the first line of defense against unwanted pregnancy and STDs, the magnitude of this lost opportunity is clear. Everybody needs to take the time.

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Step Into the New Year

If you make one resolution, do this: Walk more. Adding some steps to your days makes a big difference to your heart.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Raises PTSD Risk

Marines who sustained brain injuries were twice as likely as others to suffer from PTSD.

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A Pesticides-Parkinson’s Connection

Exposure to pesticides brought on Parkinson’s in lab animals. And a weird coincidence cements the connection in people.

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Good to Know If You Can’t Find Your Keys

The rates of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are declining.

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Cell Phone Misery

We all love our cell phones, but they can increase anxiety and reduce overall life satisfaction. They’re not too good for grades, either.

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Don’t Let the Media Stress You Out

It’s OK to be informed, but binge-watching the news when disaster strikes can cause traumatic stress.

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Sex Differences Show Up in The Brain’s Networks

Men and women are literally polar opposites. Brain scans reveal us why women are better at meetings, and men, at maps.

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Rest-Less Teens

Puberty wreaks havoc on teens’ sleep, but so do family and social relationships. Adolescent sleep problems affect academic performance and contribute to obesity. They also set the stage for poor sleep patterns in adulthood. Some social ties can help kids get the rest they need; others make it more likely they’ll join the ranks of the sleep-deprived. Learn what you can do at home to help your kids get the rest they need.

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A New Tool in the Antidepressant Toolbox?

Sarcosine, found in muscles and other body tissues, improved mood better than a popular antidepressant.

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The Brain’s Decider

Decisions, motivation and depression all seem to come from the same area of the brain. No wonder pie is hard to resist.

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Psychobiotics to Treat Depression

We know probiotics are good for GI heath. They may also affect mental health.

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Time to Limit Screen-Time

Some teens send over 100 texts a day and spend up to 11 hours in front of a screen. Younger children are not much better. With phones and tablets and television in many children’s bedrooms, it can be difficult for parents to limit screen time. The American Academy of Pediatrics wants pediatricians and parents to pay more attention to children’s overuse of media and the health and emotional problems it can cause.

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Elmo Talks Turkey

— and VegetablesWhen the Muppets tell kids about healthy eating and exercise, preschoolers listen. They even eat better years later.
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Nut Case

Simply eating a handful of nuts a day can cut the risk of cancer and heart attack — by a lot.
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Couples’ Texts Can Strengthen — or Ruin — Relationships

The extra connection text messages offer lovers is a good thing…most of the time. When texts serve as little avowals of love, they can give a relationship an extra charge. But other kinds of communication are best done in person, so couples can read each others’ reactions, according to research. And then there are those who withdraw, using texts as a way of keeping a distance.
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PG-13 Films Heavy on Gun Violence

Parents will probably be surprised to learn that PG-13 films are more violent than those rated R. Beware the weapons effect.

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Go Blue for Heart Health

A new study from – where else? – Maine shows just how heart-healthy wild blueberries are.

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Back Injuries Too Common In Young Athletes

Overtraining is the main way kids injure themselves. Specializing in one sport is also a problem.

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Music Trains the Brain

Even musicians who haven’t picked up an instrument in years pick up sounds with greater precision.

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Jet Lag and Inflammation

Researchers studying IBS have uncovered how disruptions in the body’s clock set autoimmune problems in motion.

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Nutrition in Three Easy Classes

It takes surprisingly little to help people shop smarter and eat better. We could probably all use a tune-up.

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Fit Moms Have Smarter Babies

Exercise during pregnancy not only makes childbirth easier, it can boost babies’ brain development.

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Troubled Teens on Social Networks

Socially-isolated kids can find support and friendship on the Internet. But for some teens it makes suicide more likely.
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Bedtime Matters

A consistent bedtime is a miracle cure for young children’s bad behavior. It helps prevent self-control and behavior problems in the near-term and has long-lasting effects on brain development. The gentle discipline of a bedtime routine gives kids a sense of security and structure at the end of the day. So turn off the screens, give the kids a relaxing bath, read some books, and let the day quiet down. It’s good for you, too.

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Troubled Teens on Social Networks

Socially-isolated kids can find support and friendship on the Internet. But for some teens it makes suicide more likely.

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Smart Phones, Rude Coworkers

Cell phones make the business world go ’round, but they also derail many meetings and sometimes, careers.

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A Vaccine Against PTSD?

The hormone ghrelin doesn’t just trigger hunger. It also affects fear and may help short-circuit PTSD.

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Exercise Linked to Better Grades

Teens who exercise moderately to vigorously every day do better academically. But no, running a 10K can’t replace studying.

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Do-It-Yourselfers Live Longer

Fixing things around your house doesn’t just help your house stay in shape – it can do the same for your heart.

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A Cure for Rejection

Rejection can be physically painful. But some lucky types have brains that pour on the opioids.

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The Damage Yelling Can Do

No parent starts out wanting to yell at his or her child. But somewhere along the line, usually in adolescence, most of us do. While it may feel good to vent our frustration when kids don’t do what they should, it has some pretty serious psychological consequences for teens, including depression and behavior problems. It’s not exactly good for the parent-child relationship either. Take a deep breath, grit your teeth, and know your alternatives.

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Helping Teens Cope

Giving kids some tools to deal with tendencies such as anxiety or impulsiveness can nip mental health problems in the bud.

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Walking Cuts Breast Cancer Risk

Just walking an hour a day really reduces your b-c risk; and vigorous exercise is even better.

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Your Brain on Exercise

Irisin, the magic molecule of the moment, turns bad fat into good and helps exercise boost the brain.

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When Your Lifestyle Is Your Disease

Maybe it’s time for doctors to treat unhealthy behaviors just as they would any medical condition.

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We Nap to Learn

Preschoolers need their naps, even, or especially, in school. They can’t be replaced by more sleep at night.

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The Underbelly of Girls’ Math Anxiety

Girls tend to be more anxious about math than boys are, but they perform just as well on tests. What’s up?

The
Love Hormone’s Dark Side

Oxytocin
has been called the love hormone. But it’s long-term effects lie
in a different direction.

Read
More >

Don’t
Let Facebook Bring You Down

Connecting
on Facebook is fine, but it has a downside. Make time to connect
for real.

Read
More >

Alcoholism and PTSD

Does
treating PTSD with exposure therapy make drinking worse? No, say
researchers.

Read
More >

Are you ready to start making positive change today?

If so, here’s what to do next:

  1. Click here to sign up for my monthly Newsletter: What Works: News on Health, Happiness and Wisdom. You’ll get my monthly Health and Wellness Tips, full of tips and idea for a healthy happy life. Sign up here.
  2. Email me, call me at 303-500-0926 for your FREE 10 minute phone consultation to find out how I can help you.
  3.  If you’re ready to book an appointment,  click here to schedule an in person or virtual appointment now.At Denver Counseling you can schedule with your Denver Psychotherapist

* Your Denver Counseling brings you Therapy Health News  from The Doctor Will See You Now